The IPPA Blog | The Blog of The Irish Professional Photographers Association

Archive for March 2014

The 2014 IPPA Photographer of the Year is Peter Gordon. 

To see the winning images click here

Best Architectural Portfolio: Donal Murphy

Best Single Architectural Image: Enda Cavanagh

Best Commercial Advertising Single Image: Suzy McCanny

Best Fashion Portfolio: Dermot Byrne

Best Human Form Portfolio: Michael Hayes

Best Single Image Human Form: Michael Hayes

Best Landscape Portfolio: Peter Gordon

Best Single Landscape: Peter Gordon

Open Art & Creativity Portfolio: Mark Russell Hill

Open Art & Creativity  Single Image:  Mark Russell Hill

Best Classical Portraiture Portfolio: Claire Durkin

Best Single Image Classical Portraiture: Claire Durkin

Best Contemporary Portrait Portfolio (including pets): Michael Hayes

Best Contemporary Portrait Image: Cormac Byrne

Best Children’s Portrait Portfolio: Nicole Le Saout

Best Children’s Portrait Image: Nicola Webster

Best Press and Editorial Portfolio: Michael McLoughlin

Best Press and Editorial image: John Kavanagh

Best Pictorial Travel & Fine Art Portfolio: Michael McLoughlin

Best Pictorial Travel & Fine Art Image: Kelvin Gilmor

Best Classical Wedding Portfolio: Claire Durkin

Best Classical Wedding Image: Claire Durkin

Best Contemporary Wedding Portfolio: Michael McLoughlin

Best Contemporary Wedding Image: Nicola Webster

Best Wildlife Portfolio: Philip Pound

Best Wildlife Image: Phillip Pound

Best Reportage Wedding Portfolio: Dermot Culhane

Best Wedding Reportage Image: Peter Gordon

Chairman’s Award: Gosia Tuznik

IPPA Wedding Photographer of the Year is Claire Durkin

IPPA Portrait Photographer of the Year is Claire Durkin

Winning images will be amended to this post when they are provided to me by council and reproduced with the kind permission of all the winners. Many thanks to Mike Conn and and all the staff at Conns Cameras for the sponsorship once again of the ‘Photographer of the Year” prize of a Canon 6D camera.

It would be remiss of me, on behalf of all members, not to thank Mick Quinn and all the judges who gave their time and effort throughout the year. They are the lifeblood of the awards process and to Robert Allen for his organisation of trophies and prints etc.

Well done to all the winners but it is equally important to mention all those who entered and participated in the process. Lets hope there is as many participants next year.

Cormac O’Kelly

 

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Canon’s various logo guise through the ages but regardless of the subtle logo changes, it’s brand has always stood for quality and rugged cameras.

Many photographers need to proactively build and manage their brands.

Unfortunately, most do not understand what a brand is.

A brand is not a logo. It is not a web site or a colour or a font. A brand is not a business card and it is not an ad you run in a magazine. In fact, a brand is not most of the things you might think it is.

And don’t think paying a designer lots of money will get you a brand. It won’t. All you will get is a design, which is not a brand. And beware, most designers don’t understand how to build a brand. You may not even need any design or advertising to have a strong brand.

Unfortunately, in this crazy, competitive and noisy world, you do need a brand more than ever. A strong brand, managed well, will help to correctly position you in people’s minds. It will also help differentiate you from other photographers. Above all, it will help give people a reason to buy you or whatever you are selling.

You need a brand, just as much as BMW, Hasselblad or Apple need a brand.

So what is a brand? A brand is a promise. Thats it. It’s a promise.

When you are thinking of buying anything, a car, a camera, an egg; a whole lot of things will process in your mind. Some of this stuff will be logical, tangible and functional thoughts. Some of it will be irrational, intangible and emotional etc. All the things which people will think about, and feel and believe in, these will be the building blocks of your brand. Your job in building your brand is to try and manage these thoughts and beliefs.

People who know of you will have beliefs and opinions of you whether you like it or not. Your job is to manage and influence those beliefs and thoughts before they take firm hold. To get ahead of those perceptions and to put your vision and values into peoples minds first.

Think about a brand which you value and to which you are loyal. That value and loyalty is based around your belief in what that brand will promise to deliver to you. And heaven for bid any brand which breaks its promise.

Anyway this is just food for thought.

 

**As a follow on, here is something I found by Guy Kawasaki. You could benchmark your brand against this maybe:

“The Art of Branding”

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