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On foot of the upcoming nominations and elections for the IPPA council I thought a word on leadership might be suitable.

Once in a while you meet a leader who stands out–even in a room filled with skilled, experienced, successful people. They are just remarkably charismatic. They are just remarkably likeable.

You can tell, in an instant, they simply think and act and lead differently than most people.

But those rare individuals don’t become outstanding leaders overnight. While some are born with an aptitude for leadership, truly outstanding leaders are made. Through training, experience, and a healthy dose of introspection they learn how to make quick decisions. They learn to work with different personalities. They learn to nurture, motivate, and inspire.

They learn to truly lead.

And in time those skills become automatic and reflexive. While great leaders do a tremendous amount of thinking, that thinking happens behind the scenes. In the moment, in the trenches, when people look to them and need them most, they act: swiftly, decisively, and confidently.

Want to become a truly outstanding leader? Work hard to do these eight things naturally, automatically, and instinctively:

1. Praise. It’s easy to tell when member recognition is simply one entry on a very long to-do list. We’ve all been around people who occasionally–and awkwardly–shake a few hands and pat a few backs. No matter how hard they try to fake it, their insincerity is evident.

No one gets enough praise, so truly outstanding leaders see expressing thanks, giving praise, and providing recognition as one gift that can never be given often enough.

Praise is almost like breathing to a truly outstanding leader: natural, automatic, frequent, and most of all, genuine and sincere.

2. Decide. Ideas are great but implementation is everything. Outstanding leaders quickly weigh, assess, decide, and then immediately act–because decisiveness and action build confidence and momentum.

That’s why making a poor decision is often better than making no decision at all. Mistakes can almost always be corrected. Even though you should always try, rarely must you be right the first time. Adapting and learning and revising so you get it right in the end matters a lot more.

Especially when you…

3. Take responsibility. We all make bad decisions. What matters is what we do after we make those mistakes.

Outstanding leaders are the first to say, “I was wrong.” Outstanding leaders are the first to say, “I made the wrong choice. We need to change course.”

Outstanding leaders instinctively admit their mistakes early and often because they’re quick to take responsibility and because they desperately want to build a culture where mistakes are simply challenges to overcome, not opportunities to point fingers and assign blame.

4. Communicate. Business is filled with what: What to execute, what to implement, what to say, and sometimes even what to feel.

What’s often missing is the why.

That’s why so many projects, processes, and tasks fail. Tell me what to do and I’ll try to do it; tell me why, help me understand why, help me believe and make that why my mission too…and I’ll run through proverbial brick walls to do the impossible.

Managers stipulate. Outstanding leaders explain. And then they listen–because the most effective communication involves way more listening than talking.

5. Set the example. Say you’re walking through somewhere with a colleague and you see a piece of rubbish on the floor. There are two types of people when that happens:

One spots it, stops, struts over, snatches it up, crumples it like a beer can, and strides 20 feet to a bin to slam it home. He’s picked up the rubbish, but he’s also making a statement.

The other veers over without breaking stride, picks it up, crumples it up, keeps talking, and doesn’t throw it away until he comes across a convenient bin. He’s not thinking about making a statement. He just saw a little trash and picked it up without thinking.

Simple example? Sure. But extremely telling–especially to those around you.

Why? People notice what you do. When you’re in charge, everyone watches what you do. The difference lies in how you do what you do… and what that says about you.

Outstanding leaders do what they do simply because it’s important to them. It’s part of who they are. They care about go, not show–and, in time, so do they people they work with.

6. Give feedback. We all want to improve: to be more skilled, more polished, more successful. That’s why we all need constructive feedback.

Because they care about their members, outstanding leaders instinctively go to the person struggling and say, “I know you can do this. And I’m going to help you.”

Think about a time when a person told you what you least wanted to hear and yet most needed to hear. They changed your life. Outstanding leaders naturally try to change people’s lives. Even if it’s uncomfortable. Because they care.

7. Seek help. At some point, most people in leadership positions begin to avoid displaying signs of vulnerability. After all, you’re in charge of everything, so you’re supposed to know everything. Of course that’s impossible. You can’t know everything about your job. Your employees can’t know everything about their jobs, either.

Outstanding leaders don’t pretend to know everything. (In fact, they purposely hire people who know more than they do.) So they naturally ask questions. They automatically ask for help.

And in the process they show vulnerability, respect for the knowledge and skills of others, and a willingness to listen–all of which are qualities of outstanding leaders.

8. Challenge. Most leaders implement their ideas by enforcing processes and procedures that support those ideas.

Outstanding leaders create broad standards and guidelines and then challenge their employees by giving them the autonomy and independence to work the way they work best. They allow employees to turn “yours” into “ours,” transforming work into an outward expression of each person’s unique skills, talents, and experiences.

So before you vote think about who you want to lead you and whether they exhibit the 8 examples outlined above.

 

· · · · · ·

The 2014 IPPA Photographer of the Year is Peter Gordon. 

To see the winning images click here

Best Architectural Portfolio: Donal Murphy

Best Single Architectural Image: Enda Cavanagh

Best Commercial Advertising Single Image: Suzy McCanny

Best Fashion Portfolio: Dermot Byrne

Best Human Form Portfolio: Michael Hayes

Best Single Image Human Form: Michael Hayes

Best Landscape Portfolio: Peter Gordon

Best Single Landscape: Peter Gordon

Open Art & Creativity Portfolio: Mark Russell Hill

Open Art & Creativity  Single Image:  Mark Russell Hill

Best Classical Portraiture Portfolio: Claire Durkin

Best Single Image Classical Portraiture: Claire Durkin

Best Contemporary Portrait Portfolio (including pets): Michael Hayes

Best Contemporary Portrait Image: Cormac Byrne

Best Children’s Portrait Portfolio: Nicole Le Saout

Best Children’s Portrait Image: Nicola Webster

Best Press and Editorial Portfolio: Michael McLoughlin

Best Press and Editorial image: John Kavanagh

Best Pictorial Travel & Fine Art Portfolio: Michael McLoughlin

Best Pictorial Travel & Fine Art Image: Kelvin Gilmor

Best Classical Wedding Portfolio: Claire Durkin

Best Classical Wedding Image: Claire Durkin

Best Contemporary Wedding Portfolio: Michael McLoughlin

Best Contemporary Wedding Image: Nicola Webster

Best Wildlife Portfolio: Philip Pound

Best Wildlife Image: Phillip Pound

Best Reportage Wedding Portfolio: Dermot Culhane

Best Wedding Reportage Image: Peter Gordon

Chairman’s Award: Gosia Tuznik

IPPA Wedding Photographer of the Year is Claire Durkin

IPPA Portrait Photographer of the Year is Claire Durkin

Winning images will be amended to this post when they are provided to me by council and reproduced with the kind permission of all the winners. Many thanks to Mike Conn and and all the staff at Conns Cameras for the sponsorship once again of the ‘Photographer of the Year” prize of a Canon 6D camera.

It would be remiss of me, on behalf of all members, not to thank Mick Quinn and all the judges who gave their time and effort throughout the year. They are the lifeblood of the awards process and to Robert Allen for his organisation of trophies and prints etc.

Well done to all the winners but it is equally important to mention all those who entered and participated in the process. Lets hope there is as many participants next year.

Cormac O’Kelly

 

· · · ·

Burning Man Project

Peter Gordon IPPA Photographer of the Year 2013

This is a recent interview with Peter Gordon, the 2013 IPPA Photographer of the Year. Peter was kind enough to give up some time to go on camera to be asked a few questions about his photography career to date and what future projects are ahead.

I hope you enjoy it and please forgive some of the (natural) lighting issues we had to contend with. Just click on the video below…

 

· · · · · · · ·

….. Peter Gordon.

The other category and image winners for 2013 were as follows:

The various images of those who won in various categories.

Click on the image to be taken to the gallery of winners for 2013

 

2013 Best Architecture Portfolio – Enda Cavanagh

2013 Best Architecture Image – No Award Given

2013 Best Commercial / Advertising Award – Cormac Byrne

2013 Best Fashion & The Human Form Portfolio – Michael Hayes

2013 Best Fashion & The Human Form Image – Edel Kelly

2013 Best Landscape Portfolio – Peter Gordon

2013 Best Landscape Image – Peter Gordon

2013 Best Open Art & Creativity Portfolio – Michael McLoughlin

2013 Best Open Art & Creativity Image – Michael McLoughlin

2013 Best Children & Family Portraiture Portfolio – Corin Bishop

2013 Best Children & Family Portraiture Images – Corin Bishop

2013 Best Classical Portrait Portfolio – Claire Durkin

2013 Best Classical Portrait Image – Claire Durkin

2013 Best Contemporary Portrait Portfolio – Claire Dunne

2013 Best Contemporary Portrait Image – Maria Dunphy

2013 Best Press & P.R. Portfolio – No Award Given

2013 Best Press & P.R. Image – Michael McLaughlin

2013 Best Pictorial, Travel & Fine Art Portfolio – Peter Gordon

2013 Best Pictorial, Travel & Fine Art Image – Peter Gordon

2013 Best Wedding Classical Portfolio – Paddy Clarke

2013 Best Wedding Classical Image – Paddy Clarke

2013 Best Contemporary Wedding Portfolio – Peter Gordon (Merit Award also awarded to Dermot Culhane)

2013 Best Contemporary Wedding Image – Dermot Culhane

2013 Best Wildlife Portfolio – Sheena Jolley

2013 Best Wildlife Image – Phil Pound

A special mention to Raimonda Milasiene who took home the 2013 Student of the Year IPPA Award.

Many congratulations to all those who, not only won awards this year but to those who entered and participated in the process. Many thanks to Mick Quinn and the other judges who gave their time throughout the year the judging sessions and finally to those on counsel responsible for the organisation of the awards ceremony. Well done all!

More on the 2013 awards and the winners over the coming days and weeks.

· · · ·

It is with great pleasure that I welcome Mick Quinn FIPPA as the new chairman of  IPPA Judging for 2012. I would like to take this opportunity to express my thanks and gratitude to Vincent O’Byrne FIPPA who has given so many years of valuable service to the Association during his term as chairperson. The IPPA awards are a major highlight in the IPPA calender year. Council have made a full review of the awards programme with the aim of maintaining a standard of excellence in photography as a priority. To start the ball rolling Mick Quinn kindly hosted a judge’s training weekend with Kevin Wilson FIPPA who is a renowned international judge. Taking on board Kevin’s advice we decided that the Olympic style of awards (i.e. gold, silver, bronze) is something that resonates with the public and is universally understood. Mick carried out a comprehensive review of the last two of years awards and the specific scores that were awarded in each category. With this in mind we have reduced the number of eligible categories from 17 to 13.  All disciplines are still represented within the categories for 2012/2013. One of the major changes is that ‘Diamond’ is no longer awarded, meaning that ‘Gold’ sits where Diamond was previously awarded. One distinct difference will be that for the end of year judging when participants are required to furnish printed images, each photographer may use Gold, Silver and Bronze images as part of their qualifying portfolios and single images.

Under this new system the standard required for ‘Bronze’ is considerably higher than previous years. I would advise and encourage members not to be put off by these changes as we are looking to help and improve the standards of everyone’s photography. The judging evenings will also change and be held in two sessions, a social photography session from 2-5pm and a commercial photography session from 6-9pm. A timetable has been devised with judges who are trained in their chosen fields judging the categories that they specialise in. By having separate judging sessions we are drawing on a wider pool of expertise and offering more constructive judging to help members understand and improve the standard of their photography. These judging sessions will be recorded and made available online for members who cannot attend. The first judging heat is May 14th with a closing date for entries of May 9th. If you have any questions please feel free to contact Mick at judging@irishphotographers.com or the IPPA HQ

I would like to wish each participating photographer the very best of luck for 2012!

Gareth Byrne FIPPA

President

The Categories for 2012/2013:

ARC : Architectural / Industrial (commissioned only)

CAD : Commercial / Advertising (commissioned only)

FAS : Fashion / The Human Form

LSC : Landscape

OAC : Open Art & Creativity PCH :

Portrait Children & Family

PCL : Portrait Classical

PCM : Portrait Contemporary

PTR : Pictorial, Travel & Fine Art

PPR : Press / P.R. (commissioned only)

WCM : Wedding Contemporary (only from ‘Real’ wedding days)

WCL : Wedding Classical (only from ‘Real’ wedding days)

WLI : Wildlife

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